The Holly Jolly Holiday Market

The event

We covered the University of Wyoming’s Holiday Market. The Holiday Market took place on December 2, 2013, between 9 am and 5 pm on the second floor of the Union. It hosted more than 70 vendors and hundreds of people. The market boasts a wide array of products, including baked goods, hand crafts, photography, jewelry and holiday decorations, and 50 door prizes will be available.

Holiday Market

Our vision

We wanted to do  the story in a news-style, with multiple interviews. We were able to interview the event coordinator, patrons and vendors. This gave us a wide spectrum on the different perspectives. The market was increasingly busy from the moment we arrived.

The process

I thoroughly enjoyed the filming and editing we had for the Holiday Market. I have a background in both, so, needless to say, I was well equipped to complete those portions of the project. I  particularly didn’t enjoy working with the recording equipment. Our camera would not stay charged for more than five minutes. Another difficulty was convincing my group member, Nichole, that the Holiday Market was a good story to cover.

Looking back

I was surprised at how easy it was to film without interruption. Also, people were more than willing to be interviewed. I didn’t expect people to stop shopping or leave their booths to speak with us. Plus, the refreshments were delicious, donuts, yummy. I would have liked to have a better camera and microphone set to record on, but we made do with what we had available. In addition, I would have liked to have more free time to cover the Holiday Market. My schedule only allowed me to spend about one hour at the market.

The road ahead

I will be using the skills and techniques from this video in my future. I not only plan to use this in my career but, I plan to further my education with a masters degree in multimedia journalism. This project certainly game me a better feel for on-site event coverage.

Twitter time

The event

I decided to live tweet the University of Florida’s basketball game against Florida State University. The week prior, I practiced live tweeting the Cowboys game against Ohio State. I have covered events in the past, but nothing this extensive.

Game time

The game was played in Gainesville, Florida on Friday, November 29. The Gators started their brutal four-game non-conference gauntlet with a huge win, but not without a major scare. The Seminoles rallied from nine points down with just over six minutes to play, tying the game with 28.3 seconds to go. That’s when forward Dorian Finney-Smith grabbed an offensive rebound off a missed Scottie Wilbekin jumper, was fouled and hit one of two free throws with 1.3 seconds left. FSU’s Ian Miller launched a half-court buzzer beater that was dead-on line, but banged off the rim at the horn.

After the game, I was able to interview the coach at Gainesville High School, John Hellrung, who has been connected to the University of Florida for over three decades. Also, I was able to interview an assistant coach at University of Florida, Matt McCall. He gave me some insight into the Gator’s game, from the coaches perspective. 

The twitter experience

I thoroughly enjoyed live tweeting. The high-paced environment makes it difficult to keep up with the action. Another difficultly in live tweeting is continuing to produce newsworthy information to keep your followers reading. The only frustrating part of live tweeting that was dealing with poor phone reception. The reception inside a sports arena is notoriously bad.

Looking back

I learned that it takes extreme concentration and quick thinking to keep up with the action. Also, I found that keeping tweets under 140 characters with quotes and stats inside a tweet, can be very difficult. I was not surprised with too much while live tweeting. I wish I could have been using a computer. It is significantly easier to live tweet from a computer, rather than a cell phone.

Twitter in the future

I have been using twitter for the past couple of years and will plan to continue to do so. I plan to use twitter for promotions, live events, article sharing and picture sharing.

The flip-side of ‘Skater Guy’

This assignment was designed to combine two mediums, photography and audio. Just as Russell and Felicia said, journalism is evolving into more of a multimedia field and you need the skills to succeed. In the audio portion, we exercised our interview skills and editing abilities. With the photography, we attempted to use a sequence of pictures to tell the story.

I thoroughly enjoyed working with Nichole and Brett. We all have our strengths and played off them well. It was great to have three people to split the work. Having one more person than other groups helped us spread out the work.

We decided to interview a campus celebrity, Matt Grossinger, or more commonly known as ‘Skater Guy.’ During the interview it was interesting to see Matt ride his skateboard while giving us an interview. His passion for riding and flipping tricks is unsurpassed by others in the area.

Students don’t know much about Matt beyond seeing him skating around campus. One student, Alex Breckenridge, said, “most students only know that he skates and wears parachute pants and hockey jerseys.

After getting our audio interview with Matt, we took some pictures of him doing what he does best, skateboard. He was very easy going and let us act as paparazzi while he continued to skateboard.

Combining the audio and pictures in SoundsSlides was quite easy. The audio lined up really well with the pictures we were able to take. There weren’t too many problems editing the audio either. SoundSlides ended up being an easy program to navigate and compose our project.

Our problems did not stem from finding Matt or compiling the final cut, it was gathering the audio. Obtaining clean audio was difficult due to conducting the interview outside. The wind wreaked havoc on our audio recordings. One of the interviews was useless because of the wind. Though we had to deal with the wind, we were able to edit out most of the wind noise.

We decided the only thing we would change about the project would be the length of time. It was hard to include enough background on the Matt, while staying within the time limit. After interviewing Matt we learned quite a bit about him off the board. We wanted to let people learn about Matt and not just ‘Skater Guy.’

Behind the microphone

The edit

My experience with audio went very well. I have a background in audio and enjoyed using it in the project. Editing audio is my favorite part of the process. I like finding the short snippets of useful audio and combining them into one unified piece. I didn’t have many troubles while editing. I was able to use what I had learned from Dr. Brown and breezed through this step.

Learning to help

Having a rather extensive background in audio, I didn’t learn much with editing. However, I did learn how to transfer my knowledge to my classmate who needed help. While helping my classmates it got me to remember the basics in audacity.

In audio editing, I certainly enjoyed cutting the audio and creating one flowing piece. Though, I didn’t necessarily learn anything about audacity, I enjoyed using the program and continuing my skills. As I mentioned before, I particularly liked passing on some of my skills to my classmates.

Looking back, thee is only one thing I did not like about the assignment, the length. I was hoping to have a more substantial amount of audio. I prefer to record pieces more in the 15 minute range. I found it a little difficult to keep my audio project around two minutes. It was a great experience for my editing skills.

Surprisingly not

I didn’t have too many surprises during the making of my audio. The one thing that surprised me was the amount of people who did not know how to edit and produce audio. Though much of the same cab be said about my photography skills.

The final edit

For the most part, the project went smoothly. I had great quality audio and enough pauses to create a flowing piece. As for changes, I would have loved to create a longer project. Like I said before, I am used to creating audio in more substantial lengths.

Raw Audio Reflection

The interview

My experience during this assignment went very well. I enjoyed being the interviewer. Having the opportunity to learn how to listen in silence and keep a conversation flowing helped me immensely. As the interviewee it became more difficult to continue speaking while thinking about what to say in the next few sentences. I didn’t feel the pressure from the audio recording that some people may experience.

My experience

From this experience I learned how to guide a person with questions and keep them on topic, but without putting words in their mouth. Also, I learned how to organize my thoughts before the interview and during. One thing I want to learn more about is organizing my questions as the interviewer. You can learn so much from people and their experiences. It is important to prepare for the interview and obtain the information. You may not be able to redo or do a follow-up interview.

Both sides of the coin

Looking back on my interview, I especially enjoyed learning something new about Brett Kahler, my classmate. In addition, learning about the audio equipment and software will definitely help me in my career path. Though, with the good, you have some bad. In the beginning, I found it quite frustrating finding the proper audio levels. Also, keeping the conversation was difficult at first, but quickly changed and felt more like a conversation. As I mention before, I had some problems keeping my thoughts organized while speaking in my interview.

Looking back

When I first sat down to start the recording I had to start multiple times to get the audio right. This is hard to avoid, but it could have gone more smoothly. In the end I would have like to plan out my interview questions more. I had a few notes, just to stay on track, but nothing concrete. Though, I didn’t want my interview to feel scripted or force in a certain direction.

Photojournalism

na Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th.

Ina Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th.

Ina Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th. I traveled with the triathlon team to the event as a “manager” and photographer. Every triathlon has a similar atmosphere. There is always a nervous tension in the air before the start, with an almost calming sense during the bike and run. The emotion on athlete’s faces is a big plus for photographers. There were countless expressions shown on their faces. It was difficult to get a great shot. Most of the opportunities were split second and I wasn’t always ready. I felt very rushed at times to get a picture, but there was a lot of down time after athletes passed. I am attempting to use rule of thirds and viewpoint as the creative devices. I stood in the water and looked down as she came out of the water.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre. I work for intramural sports and spend quite a bit of time in Half Acre. I was walking through the gym and see people playing basketball frequently. I decided to take a few action shots while they played. I was not able to catch their names before they finished their game. The atmosphere on the basketball is always chaotic. My experience photographing the game was fun. I enjoyed watching the pickup game and the students play with no cares, apart from the occasional gloating. Though I was in a smaller space, it was very difficult to get this shot. Most of my shots came out blurry. I was beginning to feel frustrated when photographing this event. I used background and leading lines as the creative devices in the photograph. The lines on the court lead your eye to the basket.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road. I ride my bike up the canyon at least once a week. Whether the skies are clear or overcast and windy, I make the ascent. The atmosphere on the road is calming. As for my experience, I saw the picturesque sky and thought my shadow looked interesting at the end of the road. It was very easy to get this shot. I felt calm and alone when I photographed the scene. I am hoping to exemplify contrast and experimentation as the creative devices.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, hike up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, hike up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, head up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west. “I have never seen such beauty,” said Joseph. “We don’t have magnificent land like this.” I was standing at the top of the dome and looked down to see these two ascending. I thought it was an interesting photograph showing their struggle to climb to the peak. I had a great experience while photographing this scene. While enjoying the view, I noticed the opportunity to capture the two on their climb. It was extremely easy to get this shot. I felt a little intrusive when photographing the two. I am using viewpoint and establishing size as the creative devices in the photograph.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO. I looked at the Oregon schedule and wanted to see the high powered, high scoring offense from Eugene, OR. The atmosphere was very loud in the stadium. Though, I grew up watching football in very loud venues. I had a great experience at this event. Like at most sporting events, it was difficult to get this shot. I felt frustrated trying to get clear pictures from the stands. When I finally got a decent photograph, I stuck with it. I used symmetry and patters, and leading lines as the creative devices in the photograph.

I was very surprise at how hard it is to be ready for taking photographs. I wish I could have been more prepared to capture some photographs. Also, I would like to have better equipment for shooting these photographs.

Creative Devices

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY.

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY.

Glamour Gator

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY. The dominant creative device is viewpoint. I attempted to treat the statue as if it were a real alligator. I peered over the wall and snapped a picture. I included the wall to give it the illusion of sneaking over the edge to capture the scene. I believe the use of viewpoint helps the viewer insert themselves into the situation.

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision.

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision.

Fading Vision

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision. The dominant device is focus. The photographs purpose is to show the different elements fading in the image. The light is fading, the colors are changing, the focus is fading and becoming blurred, all of these elements help produce an image that makes the viewer relate to driving at dusk or night. Most people driving at this time feel these forces on their vision.

Flying through water

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets. The dominant device is leading lines. The lane ropes in the swimming pool helps create wonderful roadway for the viewer’s eye. The leading lines create depth and dimensionality which helps draw the viewer’s into the image.

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets.

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets.

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The peacefulness the bird has a significant affect on the viewer.

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The peacefulness the bird has a significant affect on the viewer.

Winged grace

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The dominant device in this image is the rule of thirds. Since the bird is the only subject in the photograph, all the attention is focused on it. I snapped the shot so the bird would be in the far left, flying from left to right. This gives the viewer the illusion the bird is still moving. The bird is simply gliding above the water, without showing any a worry.

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench.

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench.

Guarding the fire

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench. The dominant device is framing. The use of the bench and wooden beam create a frame for Nellie to peer through. At first, the framing captures your attention, then the fire draws away your attention and you go back to her.

Other devices

In Fading Vision I attempted to incorporate the experimentation device. I wanted to try to capture a different side of how people view dusk and sunsets. I was hoping to invoke a feeling more than a visual statement.

Looking back

While taking photographs, I was surprised by how many photographic opportunities pop up in everyday life. There are numerous times in a day I was caught off-guard or didn’t have my camera. I wish I had more time to sit and wait for the perfect photograph. Being a student, with my school schedule, I was not able to wait for the opportune moment for a picture. Some photographs, such as Fading Vision, felt forced and did not turn out how I had hoped. In addition, I don’t feel that Glamour Gator turned out exactly how I had envisioned it. That being said, as an amateur photographer, I am excited to expand my imagination and vision of photographic situations.