The Holly Jolly Holiday Market

The event

We covered the University of Wyoming’s Holiday Market. The Holiday Market took place on December 2, 2013, between 9 am and 5 pm on the second floor of the Union. It hosted more than 70 vendors and hundreds of people. The market boasts a wide array of products, including baked goods, hand crafts, photography, jewelry and holiday decorations, and 50 door prizes will be available.

Holiday Market

Our vision

We wanted to do  the story in a news-style, with multiple interviews. We were able to interview the event coordinator, patrons and vendors. This gave us a wide spectrum on the different perspectives. The market was increasingly busy from the moment we arrived.

The process

I thoroughly enjoyed the filming and editing we had for the Holiday Market. I have a background in both, so, needless to say, I was well equipped to complete those portions of the project. I  particularly didn’t enjoy working with the recording equipment. Our camera would not stay charged for more than five minutes. Another difficulty was convincing my group member, Nichole, that the Holiday Market was a good story to cover.

Looking back

I was surprised at how easy it was to film without interruption. Also, people were more than willing to be interviewed. I didn’t expect people to stop shopping or leave their booths to speak with us. Plus, the refreshments were delicious, donuts, yummy. I would have liked to have a better camera and microphone set to record on, but we made do with what we had available. In addition, I would have liked to have more free time to cover the Holiday Market. My schedule only allowed me to spend about one hour at the market.

The road ahead

I will be using the skills and techniques from this video in my future. I not only plan to use this in my career but, I plan to further my education with a masters degree in multimedia journalism. This project certainly game me a better feel for on-site event coverage.

Twitter time

The event

I decided to live tweet the University of Florida’s basketball game against Florida State University. The week prior, I practiced live tweeting the Cowboys game against Ohio State. I have covered events in the past, but nothing this extensive.

Game time

The game was played in Gainesville, Florida on Friday, November 29. The Gators started their brutal four-game non-conference gauntlet with a huge win, but not without a major scare. The Seminoles rallied from nine points down with just over six minutes to play, tying the game with 28.3 seconds to go. That’s when forward Dorian Finney-Smith grabbed an offensive rebound off a missed Scottie Wilbekin jumper, was fouled and hit one of two free throws with 1.3 seconds left. FSU’s Ian Miller launched a half-court buzzer beater that was dead-on line, but banged off the rim at the horn.

After the game, I was able to interview the coach at Gainesville High School, John Hellrung, who has been connected to the University of Florida for over three decades. Also, I was able to interview an assistant coach at University of Florida, Matt McCall. He gave me some insight into the Gator’s game, from the coaches perspective. 

The twitter experience

I thoroughly enjoyed live tweeting. The high-paced environment makes it difficult to keep up with the action. Another difficultly in live tweeting is continuing to produce newsworthy information to keep your followers reading. The only frustrating part of live tweeting that was dealing with poor phone reception. The reception inside a sports arena is notoriously bad.

Looking back

I learned that it takes extreme concentration and quick thinking to keep up with the action. Also, I found that keeping tweets under 140 characters with quotes and stats inside a tweet, can be very difficult. I was not surprised with too much while live tweeting. I wish I could have been using a computer. It is significantly easier to live tweet from a computer, rather than a cell phone.

Twitter in the future

I have been using twitter for the past couple of years and will plan to continue to do so. I plan to use twitter for promotions, live events, article sharing and picture sharing.

The flip-side of ‘Skater Guy’

This assignment was designed to combine two mediums, photography and audio. Just as Russell and Felicia said, journalism is evolving into more of a multimedia field and you need the skills to succeed. In the audio portion, we exercised our interview skills and editing abilities. With the photography, we attempted to use a sequence of pictures to tell the story.

I thoroughly enjoyed working with Nichole and Brett. We all have our strengths and played off them well. It was great to have three people to split the work. Having one more person than other groups helped us spread out the work.

We decided to interview a campus celebrity, Matt Grossinger, or more commonly known as ‘Skater Guy.’ During the interview it was interesting to see Matt ride his skateboard while giving us an interview. His passion for riding and flipping tricks is unsurpassed by others in the area.

Students don’t know much about Matt beyond seeing him skating around campus. One student, Alex Breckenridge, said, “most students only know that he skates and wears parachute pants and hockey jerseys.

After getting our audio interview with Matt, we took some pictures of him doing what he does best, skateboard. He was very easy going and let us act as paparazzi while he continued to skateboard.

Combining the audio and pictures in SoundsSlides was quite easy. The audio lined up really well with the pictures we were able to take. There weren’t too many problems editing the audio either. SoundSlides ended up being an easy program to navigate and compose our project.

Our problems did not stem from finding Matt or compiling the final cut, it was gathering the audio. Obtaining clean audio was difficult due to conducting the interview outside. The wind wreaked havoc on our audio recordings. One of the interviews was useless because of the wind. Though we had to deal with the wind, we were able to edit out most of the wind noise.

We decided the only thing we would change about the project would be the length of time. It was hard to include enough background on the Matt, while staying within the time limit. After interviewing Matt we learned quite a bit about him off the board. We wanted to let people learn about Matt and not just ‘Skater Guy.’

Behind the microphone

The edit

My experience with audio went very well. I have a background in audio and enjoyed using it in the project. Editing audio is my favorite part of the process. I like finding the short snippets of useful audio and combining them into one unified piece. I didn’t have many troubles while editing. I was able to use what I had learned from Dr. Brown and breezed through this step.

Learning to help

Having a rather extensive background in audio, I didn’t learn much with editing. However, I did learn how to transfer my knowledge to my classmate who needed help. While helping my classmates it got me to remember the basics in audacity.

In audio editing, I certainly enjoyed cutting the audio and creating one flowing piece. Though, I didn’t necessarily learn anything about audacity, I enjoyed using the program and continuing my skills. As I mentioned before, I particularly liked passing on some of my skills to my classmates.

Looking back, thee is only one thing I did not like about the assignment, the length. I was hoping to have a more substantial amount of audio. I prefer to record pieces more in the 15 minute range. I found it a little difficult to keep my audio project around two minutes. It was a great experience for my editing skills.

Surprisingly not

I didn’t have too many surprises during the making of my audio. The one thing that surprised me was the amount of people who did not know how to edit and produce audio. Though much of the same cab be said about my photography skills.

The final edit

For the most part, the project went smoothly. I had great quality audio and enough pauses to create a flowing piece. As for changes, I would have loved to create a longer project. Like I said before, I am used to creating audio in more substantial lengths.

Raw Audio Reflection

The interview

My experience during this assignment went very well. I enjoyed being the interviewer. Having the opportunity to learn how to listen in silence and keep a conversation flowing helped me immensely. As the interviewee it became more difficult to continue speaking while thinking about what to say in the next few sentences. I didn’t feel the pressure from the audio recording that some people may experience.

My experience

From this experience I learned how to guide a person with questions and keep them on topic, but without putting words in their mouth. Also, I learned how to organize my thoughts before the interview and during. One thing I want to learn more about is organizing my questions as the interviewer. You can learn so much from people and their experiences. It is important to prepare for the interview and obtain the information. You may not be able to redo or do a follow-up interview.

Both sides of the coin

Looking back on my interview, I especially enjoyed learning something new about Brett Kahler, my classmate. In addition, learning about the audio equipment and software will definitely help me in my career path. Though, with the good, you have some bad. In the beginning, I found it quite frustrating finding the proper audio levels. Also, keeping the conversation was difficult at first, but quickly changed and felt more like a conversation. As I mention before, I had some problems keeping my thoughts organized while speaking in my interview.

Looking back

When I first sat down to start the recording I had to start multiple times to get the audio right. This is hard to avoid, but it could have gone more smoothly. In the end I would have like to plan out my interview questions more. I had a few notes, just to stay on track, but nothing concrete. Though, I didn’t want my interview to feel scripted or force in a certain direction.

Photojournalism

na Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th.

Ina Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th.

Ina Goodman, a sophomore at UW, exits the swim at the Desert’s Edge Triathlon. The UW triathlon team competed in their first conference event, in Fruita CO, on October 6th. I traveled with the triathlon team to the event as a “manager” and photographer. Every triathlon has a similar atmosphere. There is always a nervous tension in the air before the start, with an almost calming sense during the bike and run. The emotion on athlete’s faces is a big plus for photographers. There were countless expressions shown on their faces. It was difficult to get a great shot. Most of the opportunities were split second and I wasn’t always ready. I felt very rushed at times to get a picture, but there was a lot of down time after athletes passed. I am attempting to use rule of thirds and viewpoint as the creative devices. I stood in the water and looked down as she came out of the water.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre.

Students at UW play a pickup game of basketball. These students play basketball every week in Half Acre. I work for intramural sports and spend quite a bit of time in Half Acre. I was walking through the gym and see people playing basketball frequently. I decided to take a few action shots while they played. I was not able to catch their names before they finished their game. The atmosphere on the basketball is always chaotic. My experience photographing the game was fun. I enjoyed watching the pickup game and the students play with no cares, apart from the occasional gloating. Though I was in a smaller space, it was very difficult to get this shot. Most of my shots came out blurry. I was beginning to feel frustrated when photographing this event. I used background and leading lines as the creative devices in the photograph. The lines on the court lead your eye to the basket.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road.

Alexander Landt, a senior at UW, rides up Roger’s Canyon near Laramie, WY every week. I captured my shadow to represent my lonely journey up the winding road, to the end of the road. I ride my bike up the canyon at least once a week. Whether the skies are clear or overcast and windy, I make the ascent. The atmosphere on the road is calming. As for my experience, I saw the picturesque sky and thought my shadow looked interesting at the end of the road. It was very easy to get this shot. I felt calm and alone when I photographed the scene. I am hoping to exemplify contrast and experimentation as the creative devices.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, hike up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, hike up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west.

Joseph and Laura, hikers from England, head up Lambert Dome in Yosemite National Park. The two began their three week journey through the American west. “I have never seen such beauty,” said Joseph. “We don’t have magnificent land like this.” I was standing at the top of the dome and looked down to see these two ascending. I thought it was an interesting photograph showing their struggle to climb to the peak. I had a great experience while photographing this scene. While enjoying the view, I noticed the opportunity to capture the two on their climb. It was extremely easy to get this shot. I felt a little intrusive when photographing the two. I am using viewpoint and establishing size as the creative devices in the photograph.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO.

The Oregon Ducks line up to play a high paced, high scoring game against the Colorado Buffalos. A sellout crowd packed the stadium this past Saturday in Boulder, CO. I looked at the Oregon schedule and wanted to see the high powered, high scoring offense from Eugene, OR. The atmosphere was very loud in the stadium. Though, I grew up watching football in very loud venues. I had a great experience at this event. Like at most sporting events, it was difficult to get this shot. I felt frustrated trying to get clear pictures from the stands. When I finally got a decent photograph, I stuck with it. I used symmetry and patters, and leading lines as the creative devices in the photograph.

I was very surprise at how hard it is to be ready for taking photographs. I wish I could have been more prepared to capture some photographs. Also, I would like to have better equipment for shooting these photographs.

Creative Devices

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY.

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY.

Glamour Gator

The ‘Glamour Gator’ is created from chrome plated steel car bumpers welded together. You can see it gleaming at the corner of Fourth & Garfield Streets in Laramie, WY. The dominant creative device is viewpoint. I attempted to treat the statue as if it were a real alligator. I peered over the wall and snapped a picture. I included the wall to give it the illusion of sneaking over the edge to capture the scene. I believe the use of viewpoint helps the viewer insert themselves into the situation.

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision.

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision.

Fading Vision

As the light fades on the road to Steamboat, CO, so does your vision. The dominant device is focus. The photographs purpose is to show the different elements fading in the image. The light is fading, the colors are changing, the focus is fading and becoming blurred, all of these elements help produce an image that makes the viewer relate to driving at dusk or night. Most people driving at this time feel these forces on their vision.

Flying through water

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets. The dominant device is leading lines. The lane ropes in the swimming pool helps create wonderful roadway for the viewer’s eye. The leading lines create depth and dimensionality which helps draw the viewer’s into the image.

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets.

A swimmer takes off out of the water during practice at the University of Wyoming Swim Club. He swims at Corbett during the week and prepares club swim meets.

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The peacefulness the bird has a significant affect on the viewer.

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The peacefulness the bird has a significant affect on the viewer.

Winged grace

A bird flies low on the water at a lake in Colorado. The dominant device in this image is the rule of thirds. Since the bird is the only subject in the photograph, all the attention is focused on it. I snapped the shot so the bird would be in the far left, flying from left to right. This gives the viewer the illusion the bird is still moving. The bird is simply gliding above the water, without showing any a worry.

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench.

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench.

Guarding the fire

Nellie sits by the fire at my aunt’s house outside Steamboat, CO. The cool evening is setting in and Nellie decides to stay warm underneath the bench. The dominant device is framing. The use of the bench and wooden beam create a frame for Nellie to peer through. At first, the framing captures your attention, then the fire draws away your attention and you go back to her.

Other devices

In Fading Vision I attempted to incorporate the experimentation device. I wanted to try to capture a different side of how people view dusk and sunsets. I was hoping to invoke a feeling more than a visual statement.

Looking back

While taking photographs, I was surprised by how many photographic opportunities pop up in everyday life. There are numerous times in a day I was caught off-guard or didn’t have my camera. I wish I had more time to sit and wait for the perfect photograph. Being a student, with my school schedule, I was not able to wait for the opportune moment for a picture. Some photographs, such as Fading Vision, felt forced and did not turn out how I had hoped. In addition, I don’t feel that Glamour Gator turned out exactly how I had envisioned it. That being said, as an amateur photographer, I am excited to expand my imagination and vision of photographic situations.

Nutrition: A calorie story

Take the first bite

No matter what I eat, I cannot seem to gain weight. What am I doing wrong?

These situations are all too common for many endurance athletes. Some people want to sensationalize nutrition, spending too much time to fine-tune their plan.

Credit the chalkboardmag.com

Credit the chalkboardmag.com

“Apart from training, nutrition is the most important influence on athletic performance,” said Dr. Michael Liebman. “Nutrition is a trial and error process.” There are certain principles to follow, but there isn’t one prescription for everyone.

The skinny on gaining weight

Skinny athletes who have a hard time bulking up may feel frustrated. They can’t do something as simple as gain a few pounds. The struggle to bulk up is equal to that of obese people who yearn to trim down.

Some people have difficulty gaining weight because they are simply hard gainers. That is, they require more energy than might be expected to gain weight.

Athletes in a sport, such as weightlifting, think that strength, power, and sports performance will get better if they are able to gain weight. However, it is important to remember that weight gain can come from increases in either fat or muscle. Dr. D. Enette Larson-Meyer said, “It is hard to gain only muscle, you will usually gain a certain ration of muscle and fat.”

Calories equal pounds

Many athletes wonder how many extra calories they need to consume gain weight.

Dr. Larson-Meyer said, “To gain one pound, you could eat approximately 500 more calories a day.” Approximately one pound of weight is equal to 3500 calories.

To gain weight, athletes must know their maintenance requirement (number of calories to maintain weight). This can be done by keeping a food record for a few days. Usually by adding 500 calories per day, athletes on average could gain per week.

When adding calories to a diet, athletes should avoid empty calories. An increase in carbohydrates and protein, such as lean meats, whole wheat bread, legumes, provides a diet that allows a body to gain weight that is lean body mass.

Amanda Barlow, University of Wyoming graduate in Human Nutrition and Food said:

“Eat every 2 to 3 hours, or about 5 to 9 times per day is the best approach to consistently and properly fueling your body. Every day, enjoy a breakfast, an early lunch, a later lunch, dinner, and a bedtime meal. You can even add snacks to increase your caloric need.”

An athlete’s diet is not much different from regular diet. The biggest difference is an emphasis on certain nutrients.

Credit to cdc.gov

Credit to cdc.gov

Boosting calories

Although you cannot change your genetics and your tendency to fidget, you can increase your calorie intake.

One important aspect of nutrition is meal-time. Spreading out the calories throughout the day. “It is better to have more eating episodes,” said Dr. Liebman.

Another way to increase calories is to select higher calorie foods. This allows an athlete to increase caloric intake without having to add more meals. The highest caloric foods have the highest fat content.

Athlete’s calories should come from ratios of carbohydrates and protein to body weight. An athlete should consume eight to ten gram of carbohydrates for every kilogram of body weight. As for protein, athletes should consume 1.2 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight.

The big three

Carbohydrates are very important for endurance athletes. Endurance athletes exercising for more than 90 minute will want a high carbohydrate diet. Athletes want good carbohydrates, meaning less processed, such as legumes. While exercising athletes want quick carbs found in sports drinks and fruits. For post workout, athletes should mix and match complex and quick carbohydrates.

When increasing the amount of protein, an athletes should add weight resistance training. “The new protein needs to go to skeletal muscle,” said Dr. Larson-Meyer. “Athletes should be encouraged to make changes that will help with improving strength, rather than just gaining weight.” Endurance athletes training more than 2 hours a day need more protein.

Not all fat is bad. Nuts, for example, contain quality fats. These are essential for endurance athletes. Enjoy peanut butter, nuts, avocado, and olive oil. Their high fat content means they are calorie-dense.

Credit to imbuebody.com

Credit to imbuebody.com

When you combine all three, there has to be a balance. Endurance athletes’ diets should consist of up to 60 to 70 percent carbohydrates, 15 to 20 percent protein and 10 to 15 percent fat. These are on sliding scales, if one changes, so do the other two.

The last bite 

A strategic nutrition plan can allow you to reach the potential that genes allow you to. Nutrition supports your ability, it will not make you a world-class athlete Though, there is no substitute for well planned athletic training program.

Website usability

My initial thoughts of the website were, it is sleek and simple. I started exploring 100 Gallons for “10 minutes.”

First, I clicked on the play button in the center of the movie. After the video, I was intrigued by the button Why 100 Gallons. This lead me to then click the About button. Once I read about the project, I wanted to learn more about the staff.

Image provided by imaginaryplanet.net

Image provided by imaginaryplanet.net

So, I opened See more about the staff here link, in a new window. This took me to the Powering a Nation website. So, I skimmed through the 2013 team list.

Next, I looked at the contact tab. One of the first things I do when I go to a website is look for the contact page. I like to know how easily you can contact the site owner. Lastly, I skimmed through the awards. I quickly noticed that 100 Gallons: Reflections From A Nation Powered By Water has not won an award. Most of the awards received are for Born into Coal and Coal: A Love Story.

I returned to the original window and made my way through each story and graphic. Once I picked my way through the stories, looked at the white bubbles underneath the progress bar. This effectively made me watch movie again. Very clever…

Finally, time was up!

I would be lying if I claimed to have only spent 10 minutes on the website. I honestly did not realize how long I spent exploring it. My actual time on the website was 17 minutes. I feel the website is very engaging and interactive.

As I look back on my initial experience on the website I cannot think of any issues or problems. Come to think of it, many of the 10 tips were nailed. Still, the website left me wanting more.The buttons below the progress bar are very small. A few times I tried to click and missed the button. The website was built upside-down. The menu is on the bottom of the page. When exploring more about the project and team it directed me to a different website.

When I returned to the website, I immediately found the contact form. Contact info was clearly marked and easy to access. I appreciate how they built the website in sleek and clean format. Though it can be a bit bare.

Next I had my brother Fred do a usability test. He navigated the website from top to bottom. His first comment was, “I am confused with the video image.” Did not like the layout of website. First he played the video. After watching the entire video, he clicked Powering the Nation button at the top (taking him back to the home screen).

Confused, Fred clicked the How to View button. He quickly dismissed the information and clicked on the white bubbles. He went through the first three bubbles intensively, then skimmed the remaining bubbles. While clicking on the bubbles, Fred said, “I feel as if I am stumbling on information.”

Image provided by gailperry.com

Image provided by gailperry.com

I do not like the layout of website, he exclaimed. The website is easy to navigate, but not initially. His final comment on the website was, “I thought it was just a video, and that’s it.”

When I asked him to find the contact information, he Clicked on 100 gallons at bottom (taking him back to the home screen). Then, he clicked the About button.  See more about staff button. He finally came to the Contact tab. It only took him 40 seconds. He thought it to be “relatively easy.”

Fred and I had very different experiences with the website. At first, he was confused and I was intrigued. He did not look at the Why 100 Gallons? or About buttons. We both clicked on the white bubbles. After watching Fred, I noticed I clicked on more buttons in the ten minutes than he did.

Though the website had its highlights, a few things can be improved upon. The white bubbles underneath the progress bar should be enlarged. This would make it easier to click on them. The website is very bare at first and can cause confusion for the user. Fred thought it was “just a video.” Lastly, the page length is too long for some articles. I had to scroll, and scroll, and scroll, finally getting to the bottom

There are several things to keep in the website. The images after watching the movie were great. They relate back to certain scenes in the movie. The first thing on website is the play button on the video. This introduces you to the story and cause. Most importantly, to me, the website is very interactive. This always keeps users engaged and on the website.

My news diet

I can still remember when there was no Internet, Twitter, Facebook, smartphones, or even cell phones for that matter. My parents had a bag phone you plugged into the cigarette lighter. We would watch the news morning and night. Everyone received the newspaper. People looked at news differently.

Now, I receive news 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The Internet has created a world of constant updates. No longer are the days of waiting for the news. The news finds me.

So, I have evolved with the ever-changing world. I have a smartphone. I use Twitter, Flipboard, ESPN, NYT, AP, BBC, and countless other portals to receive the news. I rarely have to look up a story. My phone and computer receive push notifications of current and breaking news. If I get bored, I can go on Twitter and look at what rolls through my feed.

As a whole, it is hard for me to look at the news and say there is no bias. Each source has their motive, whether it be political, environmental, social, et cetera. I believe blindly trusting the news is foolish. No one should be spoon-fed information and swallow it whole. You need to read it, chew it up and digest it.

tumblr_m3ddxrmlKM1qfw2dno1_400

Image courtesy of fineleathergifs.tumblr.com

People are bored with the traditional newspapers and news stations. We want humor, action and most importantly energy. This has given an opening to shows such as, the Daily Show, Colbert Report and Glenn Beck (now off air). They have a satirical and extreme take on the news. Stories have been strung up riddled with jokes, but are usually related to current events. This approach appeals to the younger generations.

There are many reasons why I watch, read and digest the news. One is to discuss it. In order to discuss the news, one must be conversant. I tend to discuss it with my family, friends and professors. I do so through email, Facebook, Twitter and, of course, face-to-face conversation. We talk about current events or rising issues. Rarely do I completely agree with those I am talking to. The best discussions come from differing opinions. They help widen your view or see another perspective. There is more than one way to skin a cat.

Due to the enormous amount of information, I can always improve my intake. Looking at my “diet,” I have a good foundation. I will continue expanding my news horizons to keep up with media.